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21 October 2014

Myanmar’s Planned Apartheid Against Rohingya and the Silence of the World

By Richard Potter
October 20, 2014

In a move to sway the public into believing it has taken pragmatic steps to resolve one of the greatest human rights catastrophes in the country, Myanmar has confirmed before the UN General Assembly. ”An action plan is being finalized and will soon be launched,” Foreign Minister Wunna Maung Lwin said in his address. “We are working for peace, stability, harmony and development of all people in Rakhine state,” he said. He spoke as an orator for reconciliation, but beneath the gentle slew of niceties and words reminiscent of progress is a call for a process of ethnic reclassification, resettlement, and indefinite detention of the country’s Muslim Rohingya minority, many of whom are already trapped in squalid camps throughout the country’s western Rakhine State. What is most alarming is the lack of response, outrage, and even possible silent approval by the international community.

The plan, which was first exposed to the international community by Reuters, proposes that in a measure to provide citizenship to the nearly one million Rohingyas living in Myanmar they must first renounce their ethnicity as Rohingya, and claim one instead as Bengali. To many observers this may seem as a simple matter of semantics but the implications are far deeper rooted. The Myanmar government has long considered and pushed a narrative that Rohingya are immigrants who entered the country illegally from neighboring Bengladesh, and in 1982 officially stripped the Rohingya of their citizenship and nearly all other rights. Forcing Rohingya to self describe themselves as Bengali is in actuality forcing them not only to deny their culture, history, ancestry, and identity, but also forcing them to take on a label of immigrants within their own homeland.

On top of denying their own ethnicity the plan then requires those who register as Bengali to then produce documentation that they fit the requirements of the 1982 Citizenship Law, which requires Burmese citizens to trace their ancestry back to 1823, the year before the British colonized the country. The problems here are numerous, but most outstanding remains that for hundreds of thousands of Rohingyas that if they ever possessed such documents they would have likely been lost, along with all of their other belongings during the riots of 2012 where violence that targeted Rohingya all across the state displaced countless Rohingya who fled for their lives and also had their homes and belongings burnt to the ground.

A third measure in Myanmar’s proposal states that Rohingya who do not register as Bengali, and for those who do but fail to meet the requirements for citizenship, will be placed in temporary camps until they can be relocated. In this instance relocated means deported to an undetermined location. Not only is this plan inhumane, it’s also wholly unrealistic where no country or international body will willingly agree to accept such a mass influx of refugees who were deported as part of an campaign of what is no less than ethnic cleansing. The real problem this creates is that the only outcome that can occur in this situation is an expansive encampment campaign, which will no doubt resemble the squalid camps already existing which are housing nearly 150,000 Rohingya who were displaced in 2012, further ensnaring the entire ethnic group to a life of open air prisons with little or no access to basic necessities or medical treatment, denial of basic human rights, and no sign of hope on the horizon.

For those few Rohingya who do register as Bengali and pass the citizenship verification process they will still find themselves segregated in Burmese society. A notably lacking element for reconciliation the plan is that it would take no measure to prevent the isolation of Rohingya within Rakhine State, and therein restrict their movement, communications, ability to engage in commerce, and seek medical attention. For those lucky few who can manage despite the system being leveled against them to obtain citizenship, it appears what they will actually receive will only be a hollow facade of it where there rights and safety lack guarantees. Phil Robertson, the Deputy Asia Director of Human Rights Watch, was quoted in a recent article on their website stating “The few that are found to be citizens in the assessment process will presumably have the rights to move and live where they wish – but as many commentators have noted, even if a Rohingya is able to achieve citizenship, that will not protect him if he strays into a Rakhine Buddhist area.” With memories of violence that targeted and displaced so many Rohingyas only two years ago this seems of utmost importance to address, yet it remains an elusive point of discussion.

The dangers of this plan are very plain for the world to see, and the moral obligation for the international community to stand against it is as clear as any case could be, but what is so especially alarming about this plan is that it seems as though the international community may sit back and let it happen without objection. The plan itself actually calls on the UNHRC to help resettle Rohingya from these proposed camps into undetermined countries. What is assumed is that the UNHCR will not accept to directly cooperate with relocation under these circumstances, but what is not clear is why when this plan has become open knowledge there has been little or no outcry from the international community against what many have suggested is an open campaign of forced displacement and ethnic cleansing.

If the international community does not condemn this plan and threaten actions against it as it now stands they will have allowed for a campaign that will almost undoubtedly result in the mass displacement to squalid locked down camps for countless lives and an inevitable aid and health crisis that will follow as it has already for the more than 100,000 Rohingya already living in these conditions. It is the international community alone that has the ability to pressure the Myanmar government to begin reversing the policies that for decades have been plaguing the Rohingya. For them not only allow them to continue, but also to worsen, is a mark on all our nations’ integrity, morality and credibility; It draws into question our sincerity and abilities as humanitarians wherever we may find ourselves in the world. What the international community fails to do for the Rohingya, so too will they have failed to do for the whole of humanity.
_______________________

Richard Potter 

Richard Potter is a Social Worker and writer from Pittsburgh, PA. His work has been featured in Vice, Mondoweis, Your Middle East, and Rohingya Blogger.





20 October 2014

Rohingyas: No light at the end of the tunnel

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's latest report on Burma has once again drawn global attention to the sad plight of Muslims known as Rohingyas in that Buddhist country. His annual report to the UN General Assembly's Third Committee, which focuses on human rights, raises serious concerns about the condition of Muslims who are victims of ethnic and religious tensions created by official policies and hate campaigns by some radical monks, particularly Wirathu whom Time magazine describes as the "face of Buddhist terror."

This has so poisoned the atmosphere that even the democratic reforms initiated by President Thein Sein are working to the disadvantage of Rohingyas. While the government intensifies its campaign of hate, opponents of the regime don't want to alienate the Buddhist majority by supporting the minority. Even the leader of the democracy movement, Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, is avoiding any criticism of the government on the Rohingya issue.

Meanwhile, some 140,000 Muslims are still languishing in refugee camps on the western coast of Burma. They were rounded up in the wake of communal riots in 2012, although they were the victims of the ugly incidents which took place that year. The situation is so dire that US President Barack Obama on his visit to Burma in 2012 spoke of the “crushing poverty and persecution” being faced by Muslims. The best that most of them can hope for is to escape on an overloaded fishing boat to Malaysia or Thailand. Some 86,000 people have tried to flee risking their lives. Those who manage to reach their destination face uncertain prospects.

There are some eight million Muslims in Burma of whom about one in six is Rohingya. Most of them live in Rakhine state on the western coast. Muslims have faced repression in Burma since it achieved independence in 1948. Their plight can be traced to the fact that they have been denied citizenship.

Rohingyas are not a part of the 135 recognized ethnic groups in Burma. It is estimated that there are at least 10 million stateless people in the world today. One of the largest is the Rohingya. They were deprived of their nationality in 1982 by Burma’s Citizenship Law. The Burmese government and extremist Buddhist groups claim that the Rohingyas are migrants from Bangladesh, although there is ample evidence of centuries of Muslim settlement in the region.

What is causing particular worry to UN and human rights groups is the Rakhine State Action Plan which will require Rohingyas to first declare themselves Bengali (which they say they are not) and then try to prove that they are eligible for citizenship by the standards of the 1982 law. Those who fail to meet the nearly impossible conditions of the law — including tracing their family history in Burma back to the days before British colonization in 1823 — would be put into what the Burmese authorities call "a resettlement zone." Those who refuse to go through the process would be sent to a displacement camp.

This means there is no light at the end of the tunnel for these people. This is bad not only for Rohingyas but for Southeast Asia as a whole. There are already disturbing signs to show that the repercussions of anti-Rohingya violence may not be confined to Burma. In May 2013, two Indonesians were arrested for allegedly planning to attack the Burmese Embassy in Jakarta with pipe-bombs to express solidarity with Rohingyas. The blasts in India's Bodh Gaya last year were also supposedly executed to avenge the killing of Rohingyas. At the same time, Sri Lanka's Bodu Bala Sena (BBS) defends the anti-Rohingya campaign in Burma, claiming that Buddhists are acting out of self-preservation. Thailand’s four southernmost provinces, where Muslims are in a majority, are witnessing an insurgency. All this is certain to further vitiate the atmosphere in Southeast Asia.UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's latest report on Burma has once again drawn global attention to the sad plight of Muslims known as Rohingyas in that Buddhist country. His annual report to the UN General Assembly's Third Committee, which focuses on human rights, raises serious concerns about the condition of Muslims who are victims of ethnic and religious tensions created by official policies and hate campaigns by some radical monks, particularly Wirathu whom Time magazine describes as the "face of Buddhist terror."

This has so poisoned the atmosphere that even the democratic reforms initiated by President Thein Sein are working to the disadvantage of Rohingyas. While the government intensifies its campaign of hate, opponents of the regime don't want to alienate the Buddhist majority by supporting the minority. Even the leader of the democracy movement, Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, is avoiding any criticism of the government on the Rohingya issue.

Meanwhile, some 140,000 Muslims are still languishing in refugee camps on the western coast of Burma. They were rounded up in the wake of communal riots in 2012, although they were the victims of the ugly incidents which took place that year. The situation is so dire that US President Barack Obama on his visit to Burma in 2012 spoke of the “crushing poverty and persecution” being faced by Muslims. The best that most of them can hope for is to escape on an overloaded fishing boat to Malaysia or Thailand. Some 86,000 people have tried to flee risking their lives. Those who manage to reach their destination face uncertain prospects.

There are some eight million Muslims in Burma of whom about one in six is Rohingya. Most of them live in Rakhine state on the western coast. Muslims have faced repression in Burma since it achieved independence in 1948. Their plight can be traced to the fact that they have been denied citizenship.

Rohingyas are not a part of the 135 recognized ethnic groups in Burma. It is estimated that there are at least 10 million stateless people in the world today. One of the largest is the Rohingya. They were deprived of their nationality in 1982 by Burma’s Citizenship Law. The Burmese government and extremist Buddhist groups claim that the Rohingyas are migrants from Bangladesh, although there is ample evidence of centuries of Muslim settlement in the region.

What is causing particular worry to UN and human rights groups is the Rakhine State Action Plan which will require Rohingyas to first declare themselves Bengali (which they say they are not) and then try to prove that they are eligible for citizenship by the standards of the 1982 law. Those who fail to meet the nearly impossible conditions of the law — including tracing their family history in Burma back to the days before British colonization in 1823 — would be put into what the Burmese authorities call "a resettlement zone." Those who refuse to go through the process would be sent to a displacement camp.

This means there is no light at the end of the tunnel for these people. This is bad not only for Rohingyas but for Southeast Asia as a whole. There are already disturbing signs to show that the repercussions of anti-Rohingya violence may not be confined to Burma. In May 2013, two Indonesians were arrested for allegedly planning to attack the Burmese Embassy in Jakarta with pipe-bombs to express solidarity with Rohingyas. The blasts in India's Bodh Gaya last year were also supposedly executed to avenge the killing of Rohingyas. At the same time, Sri Lanka's Bodu Bala Sena (BBS) defends the anti-Rohingya campaign in Burma, claiming that Buddhists are acting out of self-preservation. Thailand’s four southernmost provinces, where Muslims are in a majority, are witnessing an insurgency. All this is certain to further vitiate the atmosphere in Southeast Asia.

Source : Saudi Gazette

19 October 2014

4 villagers arrested in Maungdaw

Maungdaw, Arakan State: Four villagers including an 11- year old boy arrested by Burmese Border Guard Police (BGP) in Maungdaw north on October 13, at night without any reason, said Kasim (not real name) from the locality.   “The arrestees are identified as —Hashim Ullah (19), son of Abdul Khader; Mohamed Alam (30), son of Mohamed Rashid; and Farooq (22), son of Mohamed Rashid and a minor boy Sayed Alam (11), son of Khalu. They all belong to Kwan Thipin village of Maungdaw Township.”

After arrest, they were brought to BGP headquarters of Kyikan Pyin ( Kawar Bill) village of Maungdaw Township where they are detained and interrogated with  severe torture. They were accused that they had link with Rohingya Solidarity Organization (RSO) a rebellion group, said one of the relatives of the victims who denied to be named.

The authority targets the Rohingya youths even the minor boy. They are innocent villagers, but the concerned authority deliberately accused them that they had connection with RSO without any proof or getting any document. The authority are trying to show their power or threaten to the villagers who did not participate so-called population data collection or census, according to Anwer, a local youth from the areas.

However, the arrested boy Sayed Alam was released on October 14, after giving grantee to the BGP personnel by his parents and the village elders accompanied by village administration officer, said  Jamil (not real name) another close relative of the victim who denied to be named.

“I was severely tortured by BGP personnel to get confessional statement regarding the said three arrestees that they had link with RSO or not,” said Asief, a school teacher who referred the boy, Syed Alam as he told.

At the same day, seven villagers were also arrested from Khadir Bill ( Ngyaung Chaung) village by BGP personnel. They were also transferred to BGP Headquarters, said  Kasem, a village admin office member from Maungdaw. “More than 200 BGP personnel rounded up the village at night and arrested the villagers. It is new method which BGP recently using to arrest the Rohingyas villagers.”

The Thein Sein government wants all Rohingya to declare them “Bengali” and then try to prove they are qualified for citizenship by the standards of the 1982 citizenship law. Those who fail to meet the standards would be put into what Burma calls “a resettlement zone”, according to sources.

Kasem, a local trader from Maungdaw said, “It is a deliberate action against the Rohingya community to participate the upcoming census that will qualify whether he/she will be citizen or not, by the standards of the 1982 citizenship law.”

Source KPN

BGP personnel start watching religious buildings and cemeteries

Maungdaw, Arakan State: Burma Border Guard Police (BGP) personnel are watching religious buildings – Mosques, Madarasas (religious schools) and cemeteries at night since 2nd week of October, said Farous, a village admin officer from Maungdaw south.
“The BGP personnel stayed near the religious building and cemeteries at night after people entered to their home and watching the areas. The BGP returned early in the morning to their stations.”

The BGP personnel started this operation after they started arresting Rohingya youths and religious students where some Rohingyas were died under BGP custodies, said the officer.

The BGP are suspecting the areas – religious building and cemeteries – for hideout of Rohingya Solidarity Organization (RSO) which the authority declared that RSO entered to Maungdaw. But, it is a pre plan of authority to harass the Rohingyas community and to show international community that Rohingyas are doing against the law, said Rafique, a politician from Maungdaw.

The watching the religious places and cemeteries are one kind of their pre plan to harass Rohingyas community and threaten the community. After that the authority will state that so called RSO groups are hiding in these places, the politician said.

Most the villagers are worry for these action of BGP as the BGP will do something and will turn over to Rohingyas community to harass and to killed, extort, jail and etc.., said Lukman Hakhim, an elder from the local.

Source : KPN

18 October 2014

Demonstration of Exiled Rohingya against 1982 Burma Citizenship Act


By Ibrahim Shah / Mohamed Ibrahim
Burma Times
October 18, 2014

New Delhi: Today, on Saturday, 18thOctober, a peaceful demonstration regarding ‘the ongoing forced Bengalization over Rohingya through Rakhine Action Plan, arbitrarily detention, disappearance of Rohingya detainees from police custody and controversial Burma Census 2014’ was carried out by about four  hundreds exiled Rohingyas including female under authority of Rohingya Youth Union-India at Jantar Mantar, New Delhi.

In the demonstration, the participants disclosed that the exclusion of Rohingya national from controversial Burma census 2014 is one of the concealed plots of quasi-military regime led by President Thein Sein to persistently deprive of citizenship rights of Rohingya.

Moreover,the demonstrators demanded that UN should be able to immediately prevent  Rakhine Action  Plan which is being conducted under 1982 Burma Citizenship Act drafted by Dictator Ne Win as the Burmese authorities including Border Guard Police (BGP) in western Burma are perpetrating in a vast momentum a series of unprecedented crimes against Rohingya—judicial killings, inhumanely torture in detention centers and rape— to implement it before final declaration of the result of controversial Burma census 2014.

The demonstration paper of RYU-INDIA is attached in the below

On 18 Oct 2014, The Rohingya Youth Union of India (RYU IND) have presented a peaceful demonstration successfully with 300 to 400 participants including women and children at the place (Jatar Mantar) in New Delhi, Idemo3ndia. The presentation of the demonstration is to take a necessary measurement to clutch Burma to be hold accurate accountability on the preliminary chaotic result of controversial Burma census. Which has been running since 30 May 2014 in which Rohingya nations were excluded from participation. So, we   need to be a genuinely inclusive and constructive way to restore our Citizenship Rights which was revoked in the Citizenship Act of 1982 and to have an inclusive transparency policy towards ethnic minority Rohingya.

Currently, most of Myanmar 1.1 millions Rohingya already live in apartheid-like condition in western Rakhine State and need permission by paid to travel from village to another. Also most of the maulana and youth have been killed brutally by BGP of Myanmar accusing linked to armed group also to implement with Rakhine Action Plan along the border of Bangladesh in Maung Daw.

Therefore, UN should be stand for by the obligation of Myanmar under international law and Human rights law covenants and take all the necessary measurement to stop the violence. Mainly, 1982 citizenship law must be amended because Rohingya will be identified only when he/she can show documents of residency in Myanmar before 1823, in this case none of Rohingya can show their document as 200 years is a long gap to keep document in order to apply for citizenship. Moreover, many villages have been burnt and harassed, for this their documents were damaged, burned, lost and etc by the state violence . Also 1982 law was drafted for foreign migrants or Bangali Rakhine migrants who are currently settled at the confiscated land of Rohingya in Maung Daw along the border of Bangladesh and applied during 1993.

That’s why the 1982 citizenship law is no concern with Rohingya citizens as they have been staying in Myanmar since 7 century earlier than 1823. We have historical bold proof about presence of Rohingya can not be erased by Myanmar Government. According to 1948 citizenship Act, the generation of citizens are citizens also Rohingya were considered as citizens as others ethnic in Myanmar since last 60 years ago.

Subsequently, why do Rohingya need to apply for citizenship after 60 years in the same nation? So we request to the United Nations,  Government of India as well as other neighbors countries to heed on Rohingya Problems and to press on Myanmar Government immediately.

Warm Regards,
MD Sabber,
Rohingya Youth Union of India (RYU IND

Rakhine Extremists Plot to Starve Crippled Rohingyas in Rathedaung

By Saiful Rohin 
Rvisiontv.com
October 19, 2014

 Rathedaung, Arakan State: Rakhine extremists blocked WFP’s access to the few remaining Rohingya villages in Rathedaung Township leading the hundreds of innocent Rohingyas to face starvation, according to a source of WFP.

Post the state-sponsored violence against ethnic Rohingya in 2012, only few Rohingya villages in Rathedaung Township survived from destruction. Two of them are Anauk-Pyin village and Muzair (Nyaung Pin Gyi) village.

“The Rohingyas in the villages of Anauk-Pyin and Muzair have been besieged and economically crippled by the majority Rakhine extremists. WFP, the UN’s World Food Program, has been providing them starving people with some food rations monthly.

Now, the Rakhine extremists have blocked the WFP’s access to the villages by building an unnecessary bamboo bridge in an attempt to starve the boycotted people.

WFP asked the Rakhine community to dismantle the bridge as it was blocking their access on Friday. The Rakhines replied that they would not do it because it cost them money. When WFP and some Rohingya elders in other regions said that they would compensate the Rakhines a triple amount, they have ignored the request.

This Bridge has been built just to block the WFP's Access. Else, it is not necessary at all considering the situation. 

And the WFP informed the Township Administration and the Border Guard Police Commander in the region, they too have ignored the request” said a vulnerable Rohingya in Rathedaung, declining to be identified.

“Now, the vulnerable and besieged Rohingyas in the villagers are going to face extreme starvation as they have no livelihoods, no opportunity for self-employment and are rendered literally jobless. We request the government of Myanmar, International Government Bodies and INGOs against the inhumanity” he continued.

Putrajaya snub for rights treaties puts refugees here at risk, report says

Malaysia currently hosts one of the largest urban refugee populations in the world, with some 146,020 refugees and asylum seekers registered with the UNHCR as of June 30. ― Reuters pic

 By Yiswaree Palansamy
October 17, 2014

KUALA LUPUR ― Putrajaya’s unwillingness to commit to key global rights treaties is exacerbating the vulnerability of refugees and asylum seekers here, a London-based human rights foundation said today.

In its report launched today on stateless Rohingyas in Malaysia and Thailand, Equal Rights Trust pointed out that Malaysia has only ratified three core international human rights treaties, despite being an active member of regional human rights bodies.

The report states that while Malaysia has ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), it had rejected recommendations to remove its reservations to three other Conventions in March.

These include the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), the Convention Against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT) and the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD).

“As a member state of the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN), Malaysia is a signatory state to the 2012 ASEAN Human Rights Declaration, a non-binding document which nonetheless is a reflection of the human rights consensus in the region.

“Malaysia is also an active member of regional human rights bodies such as the ASEAN Inter-governmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) and ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC). In 2015, Malaysia will assume the chair of ASEAN,” the report states, stressing that under these coinages, Malaysia therefore possesses a legal duty to protect the rights of refugees and stateless persons on its shores.

Equal Rights Trust said that report was compiled after over three years of in-depth research, analysis and field work by a multi-disciplinary international team, including interviews with key government officials to offer a renewed insight as to how the Rohingya issue is viewed and responded to by each state.

The report is a joint effort with the Institute of Human Rights and Peace Studies of Mahidol University (IHRP) in Thailand.

A similar report was also compiled on Thailand.

The report stated that Putrajaya, in the absence of a local refuges law framework, also often resorts to using the Immigration Act 1959 and 1963 to emphasise a system of border control and deterrence.

“Under the Immigration Act, all refugees, asylum seekers and stateless persons are classified as “illegal immigrants” and are therefore liable to arrest, prosecution, detention and financial penalties, and may also be subject to whipping and refoulement.”

The report stated that the punishments can also apply to all irregular migrants, regardless of whether they are children, pregnant women, the sick, or the elderly.

It also alleged that Putrajaya ignored the presence of refugees and asylum seekers in the country, and that the administration imposed a condition that it will be the onus of the international community, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) particularly to undertake responsibility in caring for the group.

“Refugees and asylum seekers, including the Rohingya, are also vulnerable to extortion by the police and immigration officers,” the report further read.

It said that reports of complicity by Malaysian immigration officers also continue, especially in facilitating trafficking.

“As a result of continued non-compliance with minimum standards in elimination of trafficking, Malaysia has again been downgraded to Tier 3 by the US State Department in its 2014 Trafficking in Persons Report.”

In June, the US State Department had downgraded Malaysia along with Thailand, Venezuela and The Gambia to Tier 3 - the lowest possible ranking - in its yearly Trafficking of Persons Report (TIP).

According to the State Department, countries on the lowest tier may be subject to certain sanctions, including the withholding or withdrawal of non-humanitarian, non-trade-related foreign assistance.

However, in a statement posted on the Foreign Ministry’s website on June 22, the federal government argued that the US State Department had relied on “unverified information, provided by dubious organisations” in evaluating Malaysia for the damning report.

“Malaysia believes that information that was used in the preparation of the Report was flawed, inaccurate and did not reflect measures and steps taken by the respective Malaysian authorities to counter the scourge of trafficking in persons in Malaysia, as a whole.

“We also believe that the source of the information used by the authorities in the United States of America were not credible,” read the statement.

The federal government stressed that Malaysia has a “long and distinguished record” of being a temporary home to migrants, including an estimated 35,000 Muslim minority Rohingyas who have fled sectarian violence in Burma.

Equal Rights Trust said that presently, Malaysia hosts one of the largest urban refugee populations in the world, with some 146,020 refugees and asylum seekers registered with the UNHCR as of June 30.

The majority (over 135,025) are from Myanmar, of which the two largest groups are ethnic Chins (51,450) and the Rohingya (37,850).

17 October 2014

Arakan, A Graveyard of Extrajudicial Killings of Rohingya

By Noor Shahid
TSR News
October 17, 2014

When a country has no rule of law, a country where every government officer is above the law, and a country where the majority ethnic group is above its sister minorities, the killings become an easier and common practice. It is the country none other than Burma also known as Myanmar which is branded and promoted as ‘Democratic’ after more than 50 years of dictatorships.

Rohingya, is a common scapegoat minority which has been under the programme of extrajudicial killings under the hands of Burmese Police, Border Security Guards and armed forces ever since the status of Rohingya is systematically altered from being a recognized Burmese ethnic minority group to a complete stateless.

It is the distinguished characteristics of Rohingya (being Muslim and difference in appearance) and the laws that remove the right to be citizen, the right to freedom of religion, the right to freedom of movement, the right to freedom of education, the right to freedom of marriage, and so forth, attract the perpetrators towards the extrajudicial killings of Rohingya in pure impunity.

The extrajudicial killings of Rohingya have been proven over and over again, especially since the beginning of the state sponsored Rohingya ethnic cleansing programme started in 2012. There are thousands of Rohingya people, young and old, literate and illiterate have been disappeared under the programme of the extrajudicial killings. There are thousands of families who are waiting for the news of one’s husband, one’s brother, one’s father and one’s friends who are mercilessly and lawlessly killed and disappeared.


A recent example is the killing of 32 years old Abu Toyyib who is a native of Nashaa Fru village in the northern part of Maungdaw township. He was arrested and tortured brutally by Burmese Border Guard in Nagpura Village for three days until he died in agony from the treatments he received from the officers on 16th October, 2014. 

The only crimes he has committed are, being a Rohingya, having a beard and having a family of three to support who have now lost their main support making them to be more susceptible to exploitation and pessimism.


The administrator of Nashaa Fru village has been warned by the officers not to report about the death of Abu Toyyib to any media, and if so, he too will be punished.

One of the main reasons for lack of news or reporting on the extrajudicial killings of Rohingya is the grave threatenings and heavy punishments that the officials imposed on Rohingya extrajudicially.